Monday, August 29, 2011

Balancing Rocks




Some people work hard to balance their checkbook; Bill Dan puts his efforts into balancing rocks. The beauty in this is the amazement we experience in viewing the finished "works" and especially while watching Bill create these temporary pieces. At the very end of the video you'll see him doing something that is most helpful in the process.

3 comments:

LesleyFW said...

We also rock balance and the thrill is of the challenge of found materials. Disappointed to see the grinding down of the stones at the end of the video, it takes away the pure form and may as well use glue!
http://lesleyfw.blogspot.com/search?q=rock+balancing

Bill Dan said...

Greeting . . . more of My Art here http://youtube.com/bebalance,

Cheers,

Bill Dan

Bill Dan said...

a little explanation : the process of balancing bigger rocks on top of small rounded rock - on top of another rock [ basically 3 rocks at once ] are totally different than doing straight up balancing. In straight up balancing, You are basically holding each of the rocks to be balanced using 2 hands simultaneously , one by one balancing them up.
In counter balance, each of Your hands are holding different rocks and have to use-work-move differently. Sometimes it takes a while to get those rocks to get the right connection to be balanced. I was having a hard time to find those connections because - most of all, my physical position to the rocks formation wasn't favorable to get it done quicker. I am left handed, and if You notice on the video frames, I was using My right hand to hold the top rocks to be balanced.The more practical to do it quicker is to use My left hand to hold that top rock, but in order to do that, I have to move My self to the other site of the rocks formation [ facing the camera ], but it is impossible to do that because I have another 2 big rocks formation on that area [ too dangerous to balance rocks next to another rocks balance formation ].
One more thing, the red round rocks is not really a rock - it is a brick that can be found along some beaches in San Francisco [ part of the dumped broken rubble after 1906 Earthquake ] Bricks are not solid rocks - and when You put heavy rock on top of it to be balanced - especially only on little point to connect, they tend to crack . . .

Cheers,

Bill Dan [ youtube.com/bebalance ]